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RefME – Citation Tool that Frees Up Time for Research

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RefME, a free citation management tool, only launched in Sep 2014 but already has over 1 million users. It is used by researchers in industry and academia, students, and even legal professionals, and has already received numerous accolades and awards. If you cite any type of information–from journals to books and movies–I recommend you take a look at RefME. I just completed a review of RefME for FreePint. Here’s the introduction:


From the FreePint Blog:

We asked Cindy Romaine to review the product as she has many years of experience in managing information resources and runs her own research consultancy. Having reviewed RefME (Subscriber content) she found its “ease of use for generating citations for bibliographies and footnotes” in a large number of formats of real value.

As Cindy explains, “By efficiently creating bibliographic citations, RefME gives you more time to spend on the substantive part of your research and less time spent on formatting bibliographies, footnotes, and in-line references”.

“Think of it as crowdsourced referencing,” she adds.

The product has over 12.5 million books in its database and seven export options including:

As Cindy says “RefME is an excellent product for building resource lists, bibliographies and footnotes. Because RefME is free, not ‘freemium’, you get complete functionality from this product compared to other products that charge a fee for additional features.”

Library Drove Massive Revenue Increase in ’90s – Lesson Applies Today

Author: Mike Reid
Storyteller: Jim O’Conner, Head Librarian, Kennametal in ’90s

True Story – Several years ago, the CEO of Kennametal, a company with advanced metal cutting technology, had dinner with the CEO of General Motors. This was during the time that the Saturn automobile manufacturing plant was being established. In the course of the meal, Kennametal’s CEO said that he could guarantee in writing that none of his competitors would ever have metal-cutting technology more advanced than Kennametal’s.

The GM CEO was stunned, as this was such a strong and unequivocal claim and he asked the Kennametal CEO how he could be so sure.

The response was as strong as the claim. The CEO explained that his corporate library had:

  • Huge databases with scientific and technical peer-reviewed literature, grey literature, technical reports, patent information, and more, all updated monthly or faster.
  • Automatic “Current Awareness” services that let information professionals monitor the latest technical advances with full access to the right information.
  • The latest thinking from world-class experts collected from technical conferences around the world.

Kennametal’s CEO continued to explain he had created a culture where materials scientists, physicists, and engineers were all closely aligned with his information professionals.  The information professionals were expert in efficiently finding and delivering relevant content to help avoid known problems. The information professionals help select optimal development paths, and allow the company to be “smarter and faster” from design through development, to product delivery, maintenance, and operations.

The Kennametal CEO was pitching the impact and value of the library to the CEO of General Motors.

From this interaction, Kennametal successfully won the only “sole-source” contract for GM’s Saturn plant. As the only cutting tools vendor for the Saturn, Kennametal’s revenue growth was in the tens of millions of dollars.

To truly be Future Ready, you need an information professional. It’s that simple.

Two libraries and a materials service

On a recent SLA adventure, I visited the Pacific Northwest Chapter  in Seattle and had a lovely tour of the new(ish) library at Microsoft, in Redmond, Washington. The MS Library has an inviting presence with lots of seating. They focus on training materials in the physical library and, of course, have a killer website built using MS Sharepoint.  

After meeting with the PNW chapter, visiting SLA dignitary Gloria Zamora and I travelled to Portland to speak to the Oregon Chapter of SLA, which gave us a great excuse to visit  Ziba Design’s new digs in Portland, Oregon and see their library. Ziba’s library also has a very inviting presence. The information specialists are embedded in the business and only in the library ad hoc.

And for other business interests, I visited the Uliko Studio a materials research resource in Beaverton, Oregon which just opened in September. What can I say? It’s another warm, inviting open space. Quite lovely.

It’s not a library, but a materials sourcing service. They have an interesting business model as the materials and space are supported by the vendors as a service to the clientele of designers and developers. Isn’t this interesting? The owners were very knowledgeable about materials, processes, and sourcing. If you are in the area, and interested in materials, I recommend making an appointment to visit!